NightWatch (Sergei Lukyanenko)

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Walking the streets of Moscow, indistinguishable from the rest of its population, are the Others. Possessors of supernatural powers and capable of entering the Twilight, a shadowy parallel world existing in parallel to our own, each Other owes allegiance either to the Dark or the Light.

The Night Watch, first book in the Night Watch series, follows Anton, a young Other owing allegiance to the Light. As a Night Watch agent he must patrol the streets and metro of the city, protecting ordinary people from the vampires and magicians of the Dark. When he comes across Svetlana, a young woman under a powerful curse, and saves an unfledged Other, Egor, from vampires, he becomes involved in events that threaten the uneasy truce, and the whole city...

 

Review

 

This modern day mythical fantasy is Anne Rice on an epic scale, a hugely imagined world ... a chiller thriller from cold of Russia, this one's been selling like hot cakes around the world

, Sunday Sport

So good that the film feels like a trailer for it, Time Out

JK Rowling, Russian style ... arguably Russia's richest and most famous literary talent of the moment ... [a] cracking read, owing more to Rowling or Philip Pullman than it does to the horror genre ... surprisingly readable and addictive...it relies on suspense and psychological drama and a good dose of humour - rather than blood and guts, Daily Telegraph

When a particular kind of story, heavily based in one culture, gets transferred into a culture distinctly different, something magical happens ... Something modern, new and distinctly creepy ... continues to work because the magic is rooted in the realities of modern Russia ... Inventive, sardonic, and imbued with a surprising the sense that, for this author and his audience, much of this stuff is new-minted, Independent

Night Watch is an epic of extraordinary power -- Quentin Tarantino

 

Synopsis

Walking the streets of Moscow, indistinguishable from the rest of its population, are the Others. Possessors of supernatural powers and capable of entering the Twilight, a shadowy parallel world existing in parallel to our own, each Other owes allegiance either to the Dark or the Light. The "Night Watch", first book in the "Night Watch" trilogy, follows Anton, a young Other owing allegiance to the Light. As a Night Watch agent he must patrol the streets and metro of the city, protecting ordinary people from the vampires and magicians of the Dark. When he comes across Svetlana, a young woman under a powerful curse, and saves an unfledged Other, Egor, from vampires, he becomes involved in events that threaten the uneasy truce, and the whole city...

From the Back Cover

‘JK Rowling, Russian style…arguably Russia’s richest and most famous literary talent of the moment… [a] cracking read, owing more to Rowling or Philip Pullman than it does to the horror genre…surprisingly readable and addictive…it relies on suspense and psychological drama and a good dose of humour – rather than blood and guts’ Daily Telegraph

Walking the streets of Moscow, indistinguishable from the rest of its population, are The Others. The Others are magicians, possessors of supernatural powers and capable of entering the shadowy parallel world of the Twilight. Each Other owes allegiance either to the Dark or the Light, two factions coexisting in an uneasy truce, each keeping a close eye on the other's activities around the city. Their aim is not mutual destruction, but rather the maintenance of the precarious balance between good and evil.

The Night Watch, first book in the Night Watch Trilogy, follows Anton, a young Other owing allegiance to the Light. As a Night Watch agent he must patrol the streets and metro of the city, protecting ordinary people from the vampires and magicians of the Dark. When he comes accross Svetlana, a young woman under a powerful curse, and saves an unfledged Other, Egor, from vampires, he becomes involved in events that threaten the truce and the whole city...

‘When a particular kind of story, heavily based in one culture, gets transferred into a culture distinctly different, something magical happens… Something modern, new and distinctly creepy…continues to work because the magic is rooted in the realities of modern Russia… Inventive, sardonic, and imbued with a surprising the sense that, for this author and his audience, much of this stuff is new-minted.’ Independent